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abraham lincoln but the policy is never treated as though my book is about lincoln and u.s. foreign policy. part of the reason is there hasn't been a policy in nearly 70 years, a kind of holistic human narrative about it and that is before the lincoln papers were released in congress in 1947, so there is a lot of water under the bridge, but i think that one of the reasons there hasn't been a book about the foreign policy is that there's a strong and competent secretary of state. he delegated a lot and so lincoln didn't do everything in foreign affairs. but the things he did do are really important, so i sliced it a little differently. i've taken a look at the things lincoln did do in the foreign relations but without saying he did everything right by the way. he made some mistakes, too. >> was the foreign policy all tied into the civil war? >> we treat the civil war appeared to in this book and i also have a chapter early on about the mexican war. lincoln was a freshman congressman in the house of representatives during the end of the mexican war in the 1840s. so lincoln was opposed to the
is that doha and qatar through a number of careful and calculated foreign-policy mechanisms and through this careful use of the foreign policy toolbox, several tools in the toolbox has been able to create conditions whereby they can pursue their interests. and what are some of those tools >> first and foremost, foreign-policy it might be best as hedging and this comes from gambling and it's a term that comes from gambling whereby you place one major bad, let's say you bet on the united states to guarantee your security. and you place a number of smaller bets as well unless they you may then for traumatize with come ons or iran or other individuals they may not necessarily see eye to eye. and what they have been able to do through their carefully calculated policy regimen is to position itself as an important conduit between various actors that otherwise do not speak to one another. so for example, a couple of months ago, qatar was extremely successful, although aborted in many ways, successful and position of itself and that was really an interesting development. and qatar has been able
with a different. foreign policy, different approach on foreign policy. the tenants have not changed. we will insist on our rights. we will not negotiation or compromise on the rights of the iranian people. but we believe this can be achieved best through constru constructive engagement. the window of opportunity is a limited window. i believe the west needs to they believe that the west has applied that there has been pressure on iranians because they tried to exercise their right amend they believe this needs to be changed. >> i see your rationale. you would like to see iran delivering on the promises it made. you know that now you will be planet? >> we have been scrutinized. >> exactly they have been searching iran up and down in and out for the past 10 years, probably more than they have searched any other country on the face of this earth. and they have not found a single evidence of dye version of our nuclear program into anything but peaceful purposes. so we are not worried. we know that our program is transparent. we know that our program is exclusively for peaceful purposes. so
president kennedy's senate career benefit him as president? >> he understood foreign policy issues very role with the good schooling yet developed an appreciation of how congress works. he spent 40 years there. and exactly the second u.s. senator to win the presidency before him it was of the warren harding 1920 and since then is barack obama 2008. that is not unnatural jumping off point but kennedy could use it to advance his ambition of. >> host: the book is jfk and the senate. [applause] thank you for that lovely introduction. and also for coming out on a school might. i know how hard it is to do that if you have kids or not. also for postdate this event i would like to make a quick plug if you have any changes in your pocket by a book to support your local independent bookstore.
business globally. when it does come to foreign policy, many of the public top goals are driven by domestic concerns. you can take that top concern and drill down a bit further. 50% of americans say the use of military drones make the u.s. safer from terrorism compared to only 31% who say the war in afghanistan has. surprise that most americans want the country to be the only military superpower. and more seat time -- see china as number one in economic straight -- in economic strength. while we are in asia, look at something else. more young americans think that region has greater importance for the europe -- for the u.s. than europe does, but not so for older americans. but in terms of america to other countries, this has not changed much overall. the pew research study chose 12 countries and ranked them in of who viewed america favorably. even if the u.s. is wanted to mind its own business on many issues, that is not a rally cry for isolationism. 77% say it is a good thing for the u.s. to have more involvement in the global economy. >> for more on the fascinating findings come i spoke a
was in american foreign policy. it really was like murder incorporated. the destruction of iraq, the creation of the cia black sites, the idea that the geneva convention was -- [inaudible] the abu ghraib torture, using guantanamo, you could go on and on in characterizing it. so i don't want to get into a thing about is obama worse than bush. i covered those wars, i know what happened. under president obama i think what we have is someone who has sort of rebranded some of the more egregious aspects of the bush-cheney counterterror apparatus and i think has convinced himself that they're waging a smarter war. so they're relying on the drones much more than the bush administration did, using small team of coovert operators to conduct either kill or capture, and because guantanamo remains open despite the president's pledge to close it during his anytime office, i think that the obama administration doesn't want to capture too many people. so the kill-capture program has generally become a kill program. and so at the end of the day, i think the enduring legacy for president obama on the issues i
moscow of trying to secure ukraine's foreign policy reform. the fact that we have a synthetic partnership aggression does not mean that benny on dealing with another country we can't accept any kind of shark park involvement in the bilateral relations ukraine said it wanted more due monday but russell said it was sticking to the conditions it was offering with no new negotiations the government's decision to reject the deal fueled week long protest in ukraine thousands of opposition supporters took to the streets in numbers of cities calling for closer eu ties. will the summit was a success for two smaller countries jordan until the insight into the new partnership act the use of the door was still open to pray. if the president changes his mind. it's the disease. one of danny's nice celebrated christmas markets open and i'm back on friday the kids. i hang the christmas angel to admit that the traditional greeting the stock up on the day season. no that's not that dates back to the seventeenth century. it still will sell everything from decorations and toys to feed on touring this is the
the great society indeed and commitment that johnson had. because kennedy was essentially a foreign policy president. he used to say politics can ncj, but foreign policy can kill you. he would have gotten i think it would've run against barry goldwater, he would have won a big victory the way johnson it. he would have carried big majorities, democratic majorities into the house and senate i think. and i think he would've gotten the big tax cut, the federal aid to education, the medicare and the civil rights bills past. that would put them in the lead. the most, the rest of the 20th century presidential reformers, alongside of tr and wilson and even compared somewhat to fdr. i don't think he would have pushed beyond that. i think he would've pushed toward detente. i think we would have seen they don't earlier with kennedy family did with richard nixon, because that cuban missile crisis was so sobering, sobering for khrushchev, too. and then, of course, they made the nuclear test ban treaty which eliminated the pollution and radiation in the atmosphere, and i think kennedy saw this as an ope
in foreign policy, you highlight the threat from home grown terror, from self-radicalized extremists. you suggest that the government should, one, intervene in areas between radical beliefs and violent behaviours. it should instill trust in communities where alienation is likely and integrate a whole of government approach that embodies u.s. values, can you give us the short version. >> possessing radical beliefs is protected by our constitution. that is what freedom. speech and association is about. the first amendment to our constitution. it's a core value of the united states, one which many aspire to have and observe. that's all fine. what is not fine is when possessing radical beliefs inspires the person with those beliefs, or someone he or she talks to to engage in violence behaviour. that is not protected by the constitution. the difficult challenge for government is to know when to intervene to prevent somebody from harming the rest of us, just because that person has radical beliefs. that intervention area is hard to identify. the danger is that you end up suppressing people's fr
in the less haft century. the poll found all-time low in public support for active u.s. foreign policy and growing desire to take a lower profile in the international arena. what do you make of this trend? >> three words, lack of trust. for the last three years this administration and this president in particular have not shown the rest of the world that we can be trusted. let's just take a look at three examples. israel, they were thrown under the bus at least a couple of times. when you spy on someone that's supposed to be your friend like germany, that raises concerns. and the other thing that i believe attributed to this is the fact that this president decided to pull troops out of iraq regardless of how you feel about us being there, we liberated iraq. but if you pull out too soon, that void is going to be filled by the same element that we went in there to destroy. so it's lack of trust that i believe that's causing americans to feel that we are not as well respected and, in fact, we are not. >> well, you know, the president campaigned for the white house back in 2008 he emphasiz
that leadership and what you remember then. congress had to lead america's foreign policy when it came to the issue of south africa. >> it was a very, very tough time. i got elected two months after ronald reagan vetoed the bill and when i met him at the white house that december, he and i got into a rather loud argument of discussion about why it was wrong. he ultimately relented because the senate would have its way. it was a tough fight. i got involved as a student with the movement and led as a member of the city council during which point mr. mandela found out about it and wrote me a short letter that said thank you so much for your support and in bold letters he said don't give up. i thought that was interesting because we didn't want him to give up. it's a tough way to go and to keep this in context. he was up against quite a bit as were the people of south africa. there were a number of determined people here, black, white, jewish who continued it work on behalf of his freedom. >> senator, we have you on not because you are a senator in the u.s. foreign relations committee, but
for that few years at the state department was best gift. >> the mix of foreign policy to describe her time in state and seem to all agree he was a more cautious secretary of state. but i think that can stem from a number of things. i think she by nature is a more cautious person and maybe thinking about 2016 and also could have been a lot of pressure from the administration to be cautious. i'm with luke, i think the american people have short term memories and b i don't think foreign policy is on their radar. if you look at things they care about, foreign policy is nowhere on that list. they only care with foreign policy as it connects to the economy. if anything, her time at state will benefit her. if you can picture her on the debate stage with chris christie, who doesn't have any foreign policy experience. if you look at it that way, i think it only benefits her. i think benghazi is not going to define her legacy long term. >> speaking of benghazi, there's something we need to compare, the two secretaries of state that preceded her, you find they had several ben gazdyes and it's worth n
so much. president obama in his typical foreign-policy challenges are being magnified by recent events in afghanistan. president hamid karzai refuses to sign a security agreement with the united states that would define american military presence in his country at the end of the year. but he did agree to a new agreement with iran. he agreed in principle to a friendship and cooperation path dealing with security and economic issues and within hours of that agreement, he was also already calling for the removal of american forces from the area. he said that we believe that all foreign forces should leave the region and the security of afghanistan should be handed over to people of the country. the so-called moderate has aalowed executions to surge since he took office, with more than 300 people executed since just the month of august. iran is the leader in executions. president obama and other dignitaries are on their way to south africa to attend tomorrow's memorial service from nelson mandela. hitching a ride on air force one with the president and michele obama, former presiden
particularly with of democrats. normally democrats who would give the president more foreign policy as sensitive as the diplomacy with iran has been. power to veto legislation. to the pentagon policy bill, that's going to be problem mattic. so, you know, the veto is out there, but if it's not a stand alone sanctions bill, they're a lot of work to do to convince congress and most importantly democrats not to join. thanks for getting up this and watching us on the washington journal. >> thank you for taking my call. i get my news is rt or press tv.com. i'm an independent now. i used to be a die hard republican. but my priority has changed how the country changed to foreign policy. i thought obama -- even though i voted for the party at ron paul to ron republicans did paul at the convention was disgusting. the party because -- took over the republican party. that's a jewish movement. controls the foreign policy. is led by the nose by netanyahu and they were horrible. who's the biggest influence the white house outside of the political realm. >> strong opposition to iran at iran deal.o
. >> i think it's a result of several years now of a foreign policy that seems feckless. i mean you can start with resetting the relationship with russia right at the beginning of the administration. you look at the situation with china. looks hike we're almost involved in a growing confrontation over those islands but also all kinds of trade issues. then in the middle east, things are worse in syria, egypt, things are worse, certainly are worse in iran and in libya. i can't find a place where thens have gotten better since president obama's gotten into office, and i've just spent a lot of time in south america and we're not doing too much better there either. >> i thought it was embarrassing for the united states when president putin played almost the role of dad and rescued us from a military action but on the other hand the whole thing was kind of humiliating. >> the president created that for himself by drawing a red line, seems like seven or eight times that if they used chemical weapons, there were going to be serious consequences. and then he didn't seem to know what to do when a
the president's approval ratings are taking a hit on a whole host of issues. foreign policy; proval 38 percent. and immigration one of his other signature pieces and issues 35 percent approval. and federal budget that is carl cameron 32. and economy 38. and these are approval ratings. what is going on here? >> not surprising to be honest with you. once a president gets in the soup, all of the numbers have a way of coming down. combine that with the fact that people are not sure about the iran agreement and everything else, it is not a pretty picture. something happen today that may change the trajectory. >> which is what? >> i was those -- teasing you. >> the third quarter growth up to it 3.6 percent. i don't know if that were to hold but if it holds another quarter that could turn the president's fortunes around. >> that is one. michelle what about this? >> this is the first time since 1974 that majority of americans see this country as not powerful, as powerful as a decade ago. they are less respected and think that their country is not important on the global stage and the reason why is the
's foreign policy. >> this is the key statistic. with only a third on his foreign policy, harris, he's desperate for a deal. bottom line this week, we saw with biden in asia, he was unable to persuade the chinese to stand down in the east china sea. unable to get japan and korea working together. bottom line, the obama administration needs a deal. >> that's an interesting point. >> what they want is about -- it's all about appearance. it's not be substance or rereality. those numbers drive this president. >> you think he looked at those numbers? >> of course. that's all they do. >> you're side of the inside on this. >> i've never seen anything like the way they exercise -- we're in trouble, we make up something. we go out and talk about the income inequality. which i think is a real issue, which is an excuse for your program. remember, the reports record numbers of americans saying that we have lost influence in the world and less powerful than we've been. the depth on foreign policy disaster that the american people perceive of this president is staggering. >> it's not just obama wh
. and on foreign policy what he is doing with iran may be one of the most congress convertibsequ president has done for decades. >> for good or ill. >> and in a much more successful way than doing it by trying to invade countries. to say he has no more juice in him is premature. >> and -- >> but there is a book called "battle for the mind" you ring the bell and the dogs salivate. they associate with the that. one day the dogs were in the lab in cages and the river came up, flooded the lab. they almost couldn't get the dogs out. they freaked out and lost all their conditions but time passed and they became who they were again. they retrained them. one day as an experience, pavlov poured water under the door. the moment came right back. this is the kind of event for obama. we couldn't move george bush's numbers with anything we did unless we went back to the pile of rubble in 9/11. this is obama's pile of rubble. it's not for good. here was a guy -- >> you don't think he will overcome it. >> it will always be there. >> we have to take a break. #ac360later. >>> an 85-year-old american man taken off a
issues than any foreign policy issues. the current climate is still such that people aren't really worried about what is happening in iran as much as their backyard. >> quickly, joe biden is going on an asian tour at a time when things are really critical with china and japan. >> you will be landing in tokyo to remind his friends in asia, china, japan, south korea that they aren't being neglected. stays calmerything over there. >> thank you. >> tonight's game has wrapped up at fedex field between the redskins and the giants. it came down to the wire and sadly, the redskins continued their losing streak. britt mchenry with the details. >> it has been a tough one. depressing for washington fans than the actual game tonight has to be this spot. sorry, guys. projected difficulty of the schedule, the skins are projected to have the second overall pick in next year's trapped. wait for it, it goes to st. louis for that rg iii pick trade. write down the field, alfred , 7-0 skins and they are cruising. goes downrter, rg iii for a 20-yard touchdown. griffin completed 16 to 17 passes in the f
's the result of several years now of a foreign policy that seems feckless. i mean, you can start with resetting the relationship with russia right at the beginning of the administration. they reset it and it's much worse. you look at situation with china, looks like we are almost involved in a growing confrontation over those islands but also all kinds of trade issues. then the middle east, things that are worse in syria. things are worse in egypt. things are worse in certainly -- are worse in iran and libya. i can't find a place where things have gotten better since president obama has gotten into office. i have just spent a lot of time in south america. we're not doing too much better there, either. >> you know, i thought it was sort of humiliating for the united states in the issue over syria when president putin wrote a letter and sort of big footed president obama and sort of stepped in and played almost the role of dad and said i will take care of this. sort of rescued us from a military action. but, on the other hand, the whole thing was sort of humiliating. >> the president really creat
approach to foreign policy. our tenants of foreign policy have not changed we insist on our rice rite an rights and we t negotiate. this can be achieved best through construction gea negotiation. >> first of all, what has happened, nick, since this deal was made and are there signs of how this is going to work? >> yeah, john, i think their initial reaction is tentatively positive. iran has allowed inspects yors intinspectors intoa plutonium pl meet in sr sri sr sri vienna ane we going to implement this how are we going to ensure that the plutonium plant document get dot turned on and how can we ensure that the enrichment will be diluted enough but the initial signs are positive. >> why is arri nf going on this tour. >> we have talked a lot about israeli opposition to t to to t. israel is not the only country opposed to this deal sawe saudi arabia has quitely led opposition to the bomb. and there has been opposition between iran and saudi arabia. iran wants to say we are a regional super power and the u.s. has given us the capacity to enrich uranium and we are going to be here and we'r
pockets. china and egypt at the same foreign policies toward the pressing issues and amenities. both have been working to push forward a two state solution for the palestinian israeli conflict base of the nineteen sixty seven borders and they support a political solution for this are in crisis the look. she had the time she will walk in with goals he resigns to peaceful solution. the results you email it to accomplish. no one will win. the serum people would suffer a loss both the opposition the government to cdm in geneva to implement the resolutions of june you will want oh emphasize on china's bizarre to expand the already increasing exports to egypt. but twelve economic ties are strengthening. some analysts believe the current buyback or religions are not satisfactory. would it didn't cost us three dollars due respect to china supports all you have all of the time that's variations does not see that the star of the ties between the two nations. we asked the owner looking forward to morning mass demands more terrorists egypt is now revising these foreign policy and upstream from the ti
-- american citizens take government officials who nor this reality when they pushed their foreign-policy agendas based on this. guest: thank you for your question and i disagree with your premise, which is that the world trade center was an inside job with explosives. there are the studies out there and it is pretty clear that the -- those buildings were attacked by planes that were hijacked by al qaeda operatives. i know there is a continuing conspiracy theory community out there that think this was some sort of nefarious scheme to -- it is hard to take of things seriously. i know you may genuinely believe it but i encourage you to go out there and engage in debates. i don't think the conspiracy theory holds any water. host: maurice from ohio, democrat's line. i have a question about -- let's sayear tomorrow they have a nuclear bomb. whatd of want to know would be the consequence, what the world would do about it as compared to pakistan having a nuclear bone, india having a nuclear bomb. what will the u.s. or the rest of the world do if iran says they have a nuclear bomb today? that is
the northeast. make a's dad is very excited rand u.s. foreign policy for years. [applause] you may be familiar with my dad's work to matt. he ran little league baseball. [applause] i was raised in the southern baptist church across the deep south and he of course was raised as a young marxist in the greater manhattan area. >> thank you very much. how many republicans voted for obama here? >> nobody's going to admit that. >> stand up. stand up. show yourself proudly. [applause] i didn't know anyone did that anymore. >> he used to ask that questions how many democrats and how many republicans? how many republicans voted for obama? me, a change. now they go to know. >> it's interesting because the republicans who voted for obama and the republican party itself there seems to be a lot of confusion and a lot of dissatisfaction and discouragement. you wrote this book for a number of reasons but my question is did you plan the timing of this book? >> yes i did. i'm going to drop this thing right before the republican party shinki in d.c. takes the beer truck strayed over the cliff with a government s
in the middle east. yearss a look at his 10 so far at the state department and the overall foreign-policy challenges that the obama administration faces. we will show all we can. is the policy director to talk about foreign policy challenges. welcome. they are reporting that they are talking about details. you concerns about the deal overall? guest: they are working out the devils of this plan. this is a line is deal we could have done a lot better. under that deal, the united states is starting to dismantle international sanctions. iran is not dismantling a single centrifuge. it is not starting to dismantle the heavywater reactor which a once called al plutonium bomb factory. sanctions andving spring of $7 billion to as much as $20 billion in the financial assets as well as exports after chemicals, the automobile industry and other things. bringing up a lot of money. it is not clear the concessions we got are really worth that. you have seen them move as early as last week. movement inno real terms of really constraining it, the sanctions might kick in. think they will bring this? >> par
and allowing, at the time, sort of which side of the barricade are you on type of foreign policy and you wonder what is the lesson now, right? what do you takeaway from what frankly where we are, american political culture was slow in many ways. where are we, you know, where are we today. where will we regret in 25 years that we were slow in not being on the right side of an issue or right side of history. >> what nelson mandela has said often when he was dealing with his own internal battles within the black coalition in the government as well as whites which is this idea there was a common purpose for south africa after he was released from south africa and when he came president. that's the kind of lesson that can be shared that transcends south africa in his time. where do countries, where do governments of all branches feel they are in it together and have a common purpose to solve problems, to advance freedom, to advance people from all background. i think that's one of the lessons that he already has given. i think it's amazing that chuck is right, i think he was viewed, mandela was in m
. she was a foreign policy adviser to both ted kennedy and mayor bloomberg. she has written a couple of books. and networking on the president's declassification efforts. she knows a lot about those documents. so welcome, nancy. great to be working with you again. [applause] >> we have an exciting panel for you to give you fist hand chance to hear from those authors of the many documents that you've had out here. we're going have a brief discussion from madeline albright, sandy, and leon. they have already been introduced. we're going to have hear from each of them. have a discussion with them, and take a few questions from the audience. and then wrap up around 3:00 and the president will come. let me invite the panel to come up. [applause] m. >> this an on? first i want to thank the clinton library. it's great to see so many old friend. i think the date and peace process is something we are all very proud of to have been part of and stands as president clinton's one of his many lasting legacies. and the legacy is today bosnia is a moment ethnic and democratic state. i think the team
. and the e.u. foreign policy chief is flying to kiev this week. as the cold closes in organizers need the crowd to stay on independent square. there may be safety in numbers. >> that is robben forest walker. >>> worsening smog in east china. smog conditions have closed several highways and grounded more than 20 flights for a short while. a lot of regions have been hit by heavy smog. environmental protection agency went to china to help out. >> it's more important than ever that we continue to work together. we know that pollution knows no boundaries, and we can be driven by our shared environmental challenges and priorities to layout a solid foundation and cooperation for the work ahead. >> she hopes the lessons learned here in the u.s. will serve as guidance for chinese officials work on its environment proble problems. >> reporter: if you just happened to book a flight you might want to call ahead before go to the airport. we have more. >> reporter: the arctic blasts now entering a second week is causing misery across the country. staying warm is not easy when there is ice, snow and
to happen is that american foreign policy should be consistent with the provisions of the united nations charter, which calls upon all member countries to try and settle disputes by peaceful means. as a world leader, we would like the units to set an example in trying to carry out the fundamental principles which are laid down in the freedom -- in the united nations charter. >> it was interesting, mr. ambassador. he really admired bill clinton, the president of the united states, who was there at cape town, but he was not reluctant to criticize the u.s. if he saw the u.s. going in the wrong direction. >> i think that's the model authority that he has. he wants nothing from the world and he owes the world nothing. whatever sacrifice he could have made had been made. nothing more could be done to harm him. that's why i think the power of truth was the one he spoke, but he spoke in such a gentle way. there wasn't the vittry oldic, ideological razzmatazz that he was unfolding on the united states. it was simply a reminder that a superpower has certain responsibilities in the world and needs
relations committee for 30 or 35 years, in the senate foreign policy was his biggest issue. he knows these subjects. he's have been experienced in them. he would be a good emissary. >> i think so. people tend to underestimate him this way. he does have the foreign policy experience. he's also very much a kind of one-on-one politician. what he's going over there to do is to defuse what is a toxic situation, and he's kind of the crisis manager. we've seen him perform this role -- >> i wouldn't say this in a way that's disrespectful. this should be handled at a lower pay grade. you may need the vice president to go talk to the chinese but to integrate a response from south korea and japan with the united states, that should be something that happens on the phone every day with lower level officials and it doesn't happen. >> it doesn't, and clearly this environment right now is very, very difficult. >> here's what he's trying to do. he's trying to send a powerful signal, the obama administration, to china and north korea. if you send a lower level person out there, that signal is going t
with a different type of foreign policy, a different approach of foreign policy. our tenant versus nos have not . he will insist on our rights. we will not compromise on the basic rights of our people. but the window of opportunity is a limited window. >> that was with iran's foreign minister. >>> alan gross was in north korea working on an internet project fo--incuba working on a. government. he was detained. libby casey has his story. >> alan gross' wife judy describes him as a man who wanted to help the world. >> he was very gregarious, very happy person, great personality, very, very warm. unfortunately, that's changed quite a bit in the past four years. people don't recognize him when they see pictures of him. >> decades of humanitarian work across the globe led the 60-year-old to cuba, the goal, setting up internet access for cuba's small jewish communities. now he languished in a jail cell. he has lost weight, his help, he feels like he has been forgotten and left to die. >> what could be worse than thinking your government isn't doing anything to bring you home. >> reporter: support
their foreign policy actually is. this is a perfect example where they have conflicting reports that confuse, oftentimes, our allies. when you come to foreign policy the most important thing you can do is have complete clarity. lou: administered by japan, as you certainly know well, for decades. and it is disputed territory in the sense that there are rich natural resources offshore. the chinese obviously want them. they're pretty important to our japanese allies as well. where does -- what is the smartest way to resolve this dispute? because it is certainly that. >> you are not going to completely resolve it because what you see is it is not just one area. china has been expanding their territorial claims. reseeded in the philippines. we see that the japanese. last year alone the japanese had to scramble their planes over 300 times because of chinese planes coming toward their territories. what we see in this particular situation, if we are going to try to attempt to stem and deal with it, the united states has to be very clear, have a strong presence because that is a very common in floods
. jim baker said on "morning joe" today, this was a time when congress took on the foreign policy, first override of foreign policy veto of a president in that century. >> it really was. first let me say, i'm honored to be with my sister and friend maxine waters, who i think played a magnificent role giving momentum to the divestment effort. just quickly i want to go back and indicate a little known bit of history. >> why was mandela in oakland, california. of all places. yankee stadium, the mayor, mayor cuomo. he came to see you, didn't he? >> i was overwhelmed. nelson mandela. oakland doesn't win a lot of battles over big cities. he said i'm going to oakland to thank ron and his constituency. for this iconic human being to come to oakland to say thank you was an amazing event. we walk out on the stage and mandela looks out into this incredible sea of humanity. he said now i better understand you, i better understand your politics. i looked at him and he said you represent the human family. you represent where we must go. you represent the future of south africa. that was such an incred
and greet with castro. you don't want to be winging foreign policy, making big decisions at a funeral. however, away from cameras' grae glare, they might be able to get a word in. if obama can sneak it in without being taped doing it, he might try it. >> i heard a story from somebody in charge of white house security who was telling me about an event like this that provided an opportunity for a high-ranking u.s. official to meet with a u.s. enemy, but it did provide an opportunity that never would have been there before there was an opportunity for actual diplomacy. of course, on the other hand, as you pointed out, such things can be considered huge mistakes. there was the incident when president obama in 2009 was seen taking a picture, was taking a picture of him shaking hands hu. if cameras aren't around it might be with it. but if they are, to be avoided. >> exactly. you know, this is really a day where everybody's supposed to honor nelson mandela. i'm not sure it's a day of world foreign policy-making for nations. but as i mentioned, face time between world leaders is always benef
apart on policy, foreign policy, domestic policy, economic policy, by the end they are really on opposite sides to almost every major decision coming before them. until finishes with the dramatic break over school, the chief of staff, who wants him pardoned bush refuses. it's a much more of a tale than people imagined it would turn out to be. >> dickerson: peter baker, scott berg, doris concerns good wins. all of these make -- they make good door stops. >> fair enough. >> dickerson: we'll be right back. jon thank you for joining us today. bob will be back next week. we hope you join us then. from all of us at "face the nation." happy holidays. an irregular heartbeat, not caused by a heart valve problem. that puts jim at a greater risk of stroke. for years, jim's medicine tied him to a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but now, with once-a-day xarelto®, jim's on the move. jim's doctor recommended xarelto®. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce afib-related stroke risk. but xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinn
a diplomatic one. or as it was described to me at the time, we want to demilitarize our foreign policy, and you had a very forward-leaning point of view as it was perceived whereas hagel was seen as of a different view. first of all, is this assessment at all accurate? and second, what's happened in the ensuing months in terms of where they have gone on policies from iran to afghanistan as we were just discussing, does that, in fact, reflect this far more diplomatic and less military aapproach? >> i, i don't have a window into the president's decision making, but i, your explanation does not ring true to me, to my ears. i think chuck hagel has been close associate of president obama's since their time in the senate. of he served on the president's intelligence advisory board. i think there was a lot of discussion in the first term about finding a place for chuck hagel in the president's cabinet, and i think that that, you know, that discussion was naturally renewed when there was an opportunity to bring new people into the cabinet in the second term. so i think that is the president's, you know
? >> on the sanctions, i actually -- i teach at georgetown, and i made up a coffers. i say foreign policy's just trying to get some country to do what you want, all it is. what are the tools? there's not a lot of tools in the national security tool box. there is diplomacy on one end and use of force on another, and various graduations. sanctions are a very important economic tool, and the 1990s was very much known as the sanctions decade. it was very interesting because i think that one of the other things i did at the u.n. was try to make sure that sanctions stayed on iraq. that was, you had a cease fire translated into a series of captions, and those were very kind of ham handed sanctions, if i might say. the most, the toughest sanctions on any country at all, and what we were looking at through leon's help was to try to really get more surgical with the sanctions in -- on the form of yugoslavia. one of the problems that was there, because you put two things together, is that there was an arms embargo that was put on that only hurt the countries that had seceded from the seshes. the serbs had a huge
, joining us from bethesda, maryland. thank you for being with us on c-span. the foreign-policy initiative discusses secretary of state john kerry's tenure so far. and the overall foreign-policy challenges the foreign -- obama faces.tration lac and we will talk about supreme court judges. and genetically modified foods with new york university professor marian nussle. we will look for your reaction by phone, e-mail, and twitter. tonight, republican senator rand paul of kentucky speaking at the detroit economic club about jobs and the economy. former secretaries of state madeleine albright and hillary clinton come a remembering south african president nelson mandela. and a white house briefing with secretary jay carney. >> the book affairs events from washington, putting you in the room at congressional hearings, white house event, briefings, and conferences. and complete gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house. we are c-span, created by the cable tv industry and funded by your local cable or satellite provider. now you can watch us in hd. >> republican senator rand paul at the detroit ec
you think, share your thoughts on obama foreign policy with other fox news sundayviewers on twitter at sundayviewers on twitter at #fns. this is the quicksilver cash back card from capil one. it's not the "limit the cash i earnvery month" card. it's not the "i only earn decent rewards at the gas station" card. it's the no-games, no-signing up, everyday-rewarding, kung-fu-fighting, silver-lightning-in-a-bottle, bringing-home-the-bacon cash back card. this is the quicksilver card from capital one. unlimited 1.5% cash back on eve purchase, everywhere, every single day. so ask yourself, what's in your wallet? >>> critics in this country and the middle east continue to question the nuclear deal the u.s. and its allies worked out with iran. and there is increasing concern about the new air defense zone that china has declared over disputed territory in the east china sea. joining me now to discuss this and more, former cia and nsa director michael hayden, and, general, welcome back to "fox news sunday." >> good morning, chris. >> do you look at the new six-month deal with iran as a rea
story. >>> we're going to come back with our roundtable. we'll talk a little about foreign policy, the challenges facing the u.s. overseas at the moment. iran, afghanistan just this . >>> here now, some of this week's images to remember. >>> i did love the guy on twitter pour me coffee who wrote, good job today, sports. >> i'm still shell shocked. >> we're not talking about any more reports because we're running out of time. but you're here with first read sunday. a lot to look forward to in the week ahead. surely they can get a budget deal with everything going so well on health care. >> on december 13, house republican paul ryan when it comes to the budget, nancy pelosi, they have to come up with a top line number that they're agreeing to saying in order to avoid a shutdown in january. remember, we ran out of funding in january, so december 13 is when they have to come up with this line, and i don't want to get into sequester and all these issues, but it has come to just this very small agreement. i think they will. democrats have a little leverage here, david, because republica
foreign policy, the challenges facing the u.s. overseas at the moment. iran, afghanistan just this weekend opportunities aren't always obvious. sometimes they just drop in. cme group can help you navigate risks and capture opportunities. we enable you to reach global markets and drive forward with broader possibilities. cme group: how the world advances. maestro of project management. baron of the build-out. you need a permit... to be this awesome. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. (aaron) purrrfect. (vo) meee-ow, business pro. meee-ow. go national. go like a pro. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportuni
under president obama. bill: 54-56% disapprove to how the president is handling foreign policy. 2/3 in that pew survey believe americans view greater involvement in the global economy is a greater thing. meaning when america is a strong country it's better for the world. >> we have seen that throughout history. and when we see economies like china coming up it's important to have our own economy keep going. people like to complain about america, but when something happens in the world, the philippines, the typhoon there, when something happens in the world guess who is the first country to go, the united states military and the charities. we are divide as a country on political lines. republicans and democrats are split on how they see our influence in the world. the democrats believe the president has broken his promises. he said we would leave iraq, afghanistan and close guantanamo bay. republicans are saying don't be apologizing for guantanamo bay when you are on foreign tour. bill: what do you think the apology tour did to our view of ourselves in the world? >> when you have t
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